Monday, December 21, 2015

SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS

Here it is almost Christmas and I finally get around to doing a post about last summer. It is going to be a LONG Post. This is to mention but just a few of so many. I spent last summer (2014) in San Diego and put together 21 slide productions and then wondered what was left to do for when I came back for the summer of 2015? Well, let me tell you I did 25 productions this summer  and there are still more to do for when I go back for the summer of 2017.

To start with, I made friends with some of the members of the San Diego Garden Railroad Society. I was invited to attend their monthly open house gatherings at various members layouts. Each one had a different theme. One layout started in the garage and went clear around the outside of the house. When their official photographer went on vacation, they printed some of my photos in their News Letter.




 
BONITA VALLEY SHORTLINE





 
ANDERSON NURSERY




 
BOB TREAT'S

 
 
DICK DALE'S
 
 
 

 
 
HOTEL DEL CORONADO





 
LA JOLLA SHORE
When the beach was closed because of Sharks

These guys went for a swim anyway

 
Guess who paid them a visit
 
NATIONAL CITY CAR SHOW
 
 
Owned by a Little Old Lady From Pasadena 

 
BIG enough for a very LARGE family 
 
I looked around for the Beach Boys 
 
EL CAJON CLASSIC CAR SHOW
 
 






 SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK
parking lot


 
Inside the park

 
Play Time

 
 ANNUAL SAND SCULPTING CONTEST

 
 Bruce "Jender"


SAN DIEGO AIR & SPACE MUSEUM
 
 
 This is "my plane"! For 17 years of my 32-year working career, I functional tested, trouble shot and repaired every Air Inlet System computer for every F14 plane that Grumman Aircraft built for the US Navy. There were two computers for every 36 million dollar plane. The computer controlled each of the three ramps to restrict the air flow into the engine. The F14 could go 2.5 times the speed of sound (Mach 2.5), but the air flow going into the engine had to be less than Mach 1 or you had a flame-out. The computer considered four parameters (true air speed, altitude, temperature and the angle of attack of the plane) then calculated the ideal position for each ramp and sent a signal to the actuator for that ramp to move to that position. This would enable the proper amount of air flow into the engine.  CLICK ON  DIAGRAM BELOW   

 
I WITNESSED THE DEATH OF A F14
When they deliver a plane to a museum, they don't just turn off the key. They let the engine idle until it sputters and gasps for fuel . . . . and then dies. 

 

 

1 comment: